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This table is an extremely useful document in that it helps to make sense of the various members of the COULTERs and BRADFORDS as well as their relationship with the townland of Cavananore, Co. Louth. Thanks to Wendy Jack who created it.
Sharon Oddie Brown, September 4, 2008
Updated September 1, 2009 with new info from deeds.
Updated. November 1, 2009 Bit by bit I am adding hyperlinks
Updated March 26, 2010 - addition from 1896
Updated March 29 2010 - 1911 Census material
Updated April 7, 2010 - 1915 material
Updated 1831- 1832 Freeholders records added.
Updated December 28, 2010. Added 1663 info.

COULTER, BRADFORD & Cavananore Timeline.

SEE: Map and photos of Cavananore

COULTER BRADFORD and Cavananore Timeline in Table form.

 

 

1641

Sir Christopher BELLEW was the proprietor in the 1641 Civil Survey. The land was included in the five Townes of Fewes and were in the Parish of Creggan. Cavanmore included 112 acres. SOURCE: Brendan Hall's Website on Co. Louth

1654 The land passed from Sir Christopher BELLEW to Sir John BELLEW.
4 May 1663 Sir John BELLEW received title to 112 acres of Cavananore as well as 6 acres of Bog as part of the Cromwellian land transfers. SOURCE: The History of the Parish of Creggan in the 17th and 18th Centuries. L. P. Murray, Isaac Dobson, Wm. Frankland, J. Southey. Journal of the County Louth Archaeological Society, Vol. 8, No. 2 (1934), pp. 117-163

1690

In her family history notes, Amy Oliver (Jackson) Lloyd wrote: Cavananore (Round Hill of Gold) was granted to the Coulters after the Battle of the Boyne - from there to twin Bradfords, and then to Sir Thomas Jackson. However, this would seem to be a gross over-simplification!

1734

Nathanial COULTER, son of Samuel COULTER of Cavananore is mentioned. From other deeds, it would appear that he has at least 3 brothers: Charles, William and John and that they were also associated with the townland of Carrickastuck (on the south-easterly border of Cavananore). SEE: http://www.thesilverbowl.com/documents/1734Mar11-BELLEW-SIMPSON.html

1753

John and Andrew COULTER of Cavananore rented from Rev. Patrick SIMPSON lands in Dungooley as well as a bog in Foughart. An addendum dated 1765 indicates that Grizel SIMSON (daughter of Rev. Patrick SIMPSON) was dead.

SEE: http://www.thesilverbowl.com/documents/1753May29-SIMSON-COULTER.html

1761

John Coulter, farmer of (blank), Co Louth – witness to marriage agreement of Samuel Donnaldson and Elizabeth Moffatt.This is possibly John of Cavananore, husband of Martha Cowen & brother of Barbara Bradford.1761 December 1

1768

Agreements 4 Aug between John Coulter, farmer of Cavananore, and Andrew Coulter of Cavananore, re lands in Maghban, Dungooley and Anaghavackey held in joint lease; witnessed by Nathaniel Coulter & Thomas Bradford. 1768 Agreement

1775

Andrew Coulter of Cavananore made will 17 Aug, probated 27 Dec. Executors were nephews Thomas & Samuel Bradford. They received freehold leases for Dungooley, Co Louth; Tulleyvallen and Maubaan, Co Armagh. No mention of Andrew actually having any holdings in Cavananore, despite residing there. 1775 Will of Andrew COULTER

1775

Dec 29- Dec 1776. Receipts in 1791 to Elizabeth BRADFORD.  SEE: http://www.thesilverbowl.com/documents/Miscellaneous_Property/1775-1776_AndrewCoulter_ReceiptsofLegacies.htm

1779 Robert Sibthorpe leased to Thomas & Samuel BRADFORD 133 acres 1 rood & 24 perches of Cavananore '"formerly enjoyed by Samuel and John Culter"for the "Lives of James Breakey and Isaiah Breaky sons of Isaiah Breaky of Millford in the county of Monaghan and James Dickie eldest son of Robert Dickie" - and also making reference to an earlier lease from Right Honourable Elizabeth Dowager Boyne that also included Martha Culter (aka COWEN). 1779 February 16

1785

John Bradford of Cavananore made will 9 Jul 1785.. No mention of lands.1785 Will of John BRADFORD

1789

April 11. John Bradford of Cavananore died.

1790

Martha (Cowen) Coulter of Cavananore, widow of John Coulter, made will 5 Apr. Executors Thomas Bradford, Samuel Bradford & David Jackson; beneficiary son Joseph Coulter – incompetent to manage affairs; executors appointed as Joseph's guardians, to support him and manage his affairs; on Joseph's death, executors to receive residue of estate. No mention of lands – goods and chattles only.1790 Will of Martha COULTER

1790

Thomas Bradford of Cavananore died intestate 20 Dec. 1790

1791

Administration of estate of Thomas Bradford of C. granted 25 Mar to widow Elizabeth. See inventory at The Silver Bowl.

1791

Martha COULTER (nèe COWEN, wife of John COULTER) of Cavananore was broken into and robbed. The list of those who put up money for a reward is most interesting. SEE: http://www.thesilverbowl.com/documents/1734Mar11-BELLEW-SIMPSON.html

1793

John McKee of Corvoy, Tullycorbett Parish, Co Monaghan, makes will leaving all his lands and goods to wife Margaret, except his clock which he bequeathed to his stepson, Margaret's son John Coulter (who was the father of Rev John Coulter DD and Rev George Bartley Coulter). Was John McKee any relation to the James and Hanna McKee of Castleblayney, mentioned in the 1790 will of Martha Coulter? And where did these Coulters fit in to the Carnbeg/Cavananore lot? Will of John McKEE

1799

Agreement, 5 Feb, between Thomas Bradford & Mrs Elizabeth Bradford re division of land of Martha Coulter.

1799

Letter, 16 Feb, from George Jackson to his nephew John Jackson. This letter is very interesting, on several counts. It proves the connection between Barbara Coulter and her brother John Coulter (described as John Jackson's uncle, but actually his great uncle.) It mentions a Mr Birch who is about to leave the country – probably Thomas Ledlie Birch, voluntarily exiled for his involvement in the 1798 uprising. It makes reference to "Mrs Coulter's will"; this would be 1790 will of Martha (Cowen) Coulter. It says "your friends in Cavananore seem very anxious to get Joe Coulters property into their clutches". This refers to Joseph Coulter, son of John Coulter and Martha Cowen. The "friends in Cavananore" are probably Elizabeth (Breakey) Bradford (niece of Thomas Ledlie Birch), her son Andrew Coulter Bradford, and her brother-in-law Samuel Bradford. The letter also mentions "the Bonds due to your Aunt and Uncle Coulter"; this would seem to be either Nathaniel Coulter or another, as yet unknown. brother of Barbara (Coulter) Bradford.

1802

Map of land in Anaghavaky, adjoining Cavananore, belonging to Samuel and Andrew Bradford. This would appear to be Samuel (1739-1818) and his nephew Andrew Coulter Bradford. Neither appears to reside on the lands – they were leased out. Probably one of the properties referred to in the 1768 agreement. If so, did all the land pass to the Bradfords from Andrew Coulter, or was some of it John's share, passed down through his wife Martha & son Joseph, to Joseph's guardians?

1803

December 5. A Patrick CONNOLLY of Cavananore was a witness to a deed between Charles COULTER of Annaghvacky and Owen ROONEY of Carrickastuck. SEE: http://www.thesilverbowl.com/documents/1803Dec5-COULTER-ROONEY.html

1809

21 Apr, Andrew Coulter Bradford of Cavananore made an agreement regarding the support of his mother Eliza and unmarried sisters Peggy and Mary. (As Andrew's father died intestate, Andrew as the only son would have inherited everything, and this agreement probably was made to ensure his mother and sisters were looked after. My guess is that it was made when Andrew turned 21 and came into his inheritance.) Eliza and the girls were to continue living in the house, with use of the furnishings. Andrew was to be responsible for the exterior maintenance, while Eliza was responsible for inside repairs. Andrew was also to provide certain farm produce and livestock, including a milch cow and a horse to carry the family to church on Sundays. In the event of Eliza's death, the arrangements were to continue in respect of any sisters who remained unmarried, until such time as they married. In additon to this, Andrew agreed to pay his married sisters Barbara and Betty £100 each within five years. He also agreed to pay each of his unmarried sisters £100 at the time of her marriage, and a further £100 within five years of the marriage.

1812

June 3. An updating of lives relating to the 1753 lease of Dungooley. Samuel BRADFORD and Andrew BRADFORD of Cavananore as well as Joseph COULTER of Liscalgot are mentioned. SEE: http://www.thesilverbowl.com/documents/1812Jan3-BRADFORD.html

1822

Andrew Coulter Bradford and Thomas Bradford divide land in Annaghavackey, adjoining Cavananore - see map. This appears to be the same land as the 1802 map. Presumably Thomas is the son of Samuel B. and Margaret Henry, and inherited the property after the death of his father in 1818. Probably the land was previously jointly owned (see 1768 agreement), but at this time ownership was divided and this map shows the way it was apportioned.

1822

County Louth Freeholders 1822 (see http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~fianna/county/louth/loufree1822.html)

List of names transcribed by Brendan Hall from A List of Registered Freeholders of the County of Louth, 1822, Consisting of the Baronies of Ardee, Ferrard, Louth, Upper and Lower Dundalk, (Dundalk, 1822: James Parks).

Name

Place of Abode

Situation of
Freehold

Landlords' Names

Registry Place, Date

Barony

Bradford Andrew

Cavananore

Cavananore

-----

Dundalk 12/04/1820

Upper Dundalk

Coulter Samuel

Carnbeg

Carnbeg

-----

Dundalk 12/04/1820

Upper Dundalk

Coulter Thomas

Co. of Dublin

Killen

Earl of Roden

Dundalk 01/08/1820

Upper Dundalk

Coulter Thomas

Skyhill

Skyhill

-----

Dundalk 01/08/1820

Upper Dundalk

1831 Jan 13, 1831 PRONI Freeholders records. ARM/5/2/16 Samuel BRADFORD and John BRADFORD leased from Thomas BALL.
1832

Oct 15, 1852 Samuel BRADFORD resident at Cavananore leased lands at Cullyhanna from Thomas BALL. So did Thomas BRADFORD and John BRADFORD both of them resident at Carnbeg. All Cullyhanna leases valued at £20.
Andrew Coulter BRADFORD resident at Cavananore leased lands at Mybane from Thomas BALL: Valuation £50. PRONI ARM/5/2/17

1835

Feb 5. 30 acres of Cavananore were released as part of the marriage settlement between Margaret WALLACE & Thomas BRADFORD. Robert DICKIE of Roachdale and John BRADFORD of Cavananore were trustees at the time (Margaret had been 16 years old when her father died and 12 years old when her mother died). This 30 acres was bounded on the east by a portion of Cavananore held by Andrew Coulter BRADFORD and on the south by land held jointly by Samuel BRADFORD and Andrew Coulter BRADFORD.

SEE: http://www.thesilverbowl.com/documents/1835Feb5-BRADFORD-WALLACE.html

1835

Feb 12. This concerns lands on the border of Cavananore and is pivotal to later legal cases involving COULTERs and BAILIEs.

SEE: http://www.thesilverbowl.com/documents/1835Feb12-ATKINSON-BAILLIE.html

1837c

County Louth – Tenants of Lord Roden circa 1837

(see http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~fianna/county/louth/rodn1837.html )

List of names transcribed by Brendan Hall from The Roden Title. Statement of Title of The Right Hon. Robert Earl of Roden to the Manor, Town, and Lands of Dundalk and Other Lands in The County of Louth, in Ireland with The Opinion of the Right Hon. Thomas Lefroy Thereon, (Dublin: Hodges and Smith.) No publication date, believed to be c1834-7.

Tenant

Denominations

Date of Grant or Lease

Name of Original Lessee

Tenure

Bradford Thomas

Deer Park

-

-

At will

Bradford Thomas

Lisnawilly (part of)

-

-

At will

Bradford Thomas

North Marsh (part of)

-

-

At will

Coulter Samuel

Dowdal's Hill (part of)

11/11/1781

Brady James

999 years

Coulter Thomas

Dowdall's Hill (part of)

1810

Coulter Joseph

3 lives or 61 years

Sam Coulter heirs of

Carnbeg

1804

Samuel Coulter

3 lives or 61 years

Tipping Francis reps. of

North Marsh (part of)

11/11/1781

Tipping Edward

999 years

1838

June 16. Death of Samuel BRADFORD of Dundalk. Samuel BRADFORD of Cavananore served as one of his executors.The father of the deceased Samuel BRADFORD was William BRADFORD of Ravensdale, Ballymascanlon, Co. Louth. I suspect a link between all of them and the earlier John BRADFORD (1705-1789) of Cavananore.

SEE: http://www.thesilverbowl.com/documents/1838SamuelBRADFORD-Will.html

1839

Nov 13.

1845

30 Oct, probate of will of Elizabeth (Breakey) Bradford of Cavananore.

1847

March 26. Andrew Coulter Bradford, farmer of Cavananore, died 10 May. His will and the administration of his estate became sources of contention between various related families for more than 50 years. SEE: http://www.thesilverbowl.com/documents/1847_will_AC_Bradford.htm

1850

16 Jan, Barbara (Bradford) Donaldson of Dublin sought Counsel's advice re the action of the executors of the will of her brother Andrew. Despite the testator's instructions in his will that his properties should be let out, and the proceeds from the rents used to pay various annuities, the executors allowed Andrew's unmarried sister Margaret Bradford and niece Mary Jane Oliver to continue living at Cavananore, manage the farm and derive support from the produce of the lands.

1851

3 May, jury sworn at inquest on murder of Samuel Coulter of Shortstone; members included: Samuel Bradford (foreman), John Bradford.

1859

4 May, Margaret Bradford of Cavananore wrote her will. (She died 17 Aug 1874).

1863

14 Jan, Agreement between brothers John and Thomas Bradford, re lease of some land in Cavananore and Annaghavackey. Johnwas to remain in occupation of the house and gardens, rent-free. With the exception of th Annaghavackey portion, this land was sold by Thomas' son Samuel in 1900.

1863

3 Nov, Barabara Donaldson of Cavananore wrote her will. Previous references to her had her living in Dublin and in Freeduff, Co Armagh. (She died 31 Mar 1865.) Had she moved back to Cavananore when she was widowed to live with her sister Margaret?

1865

19 Jul, Thomas Bradford of Carnbeg assaulted after a political meeting in Dundalk.

1865

Sep, livestock maliciously slaughtered on property of Thomas Bradford, Carnbeg.

1866

3 Apr, Samuel Bradford, jun, re-elected deputy vice-chairman of Dundalk Poor-Law Union.

1869

3 Apr, Samuel Bradford, jun., and Samuel Bradford (Cavananore) sworn as members of Co Louth Grand Jury, Dundalk Quarter Sessions.

1870

29 Jan, subscribers to a published request for a public meeting to be held in Dublin to discuss the Land Question included: Samuel Bradford, jun, P L G, Dundalk Union Samuel Bradford, sen, P L G, Dundalk Union

1870

29 Apr, Samuel Bradford, sen, summoned James M'Ardle on charges of forging and falsifying two voting-papers in the recently held Poor-law elections. Bradford had been a Guardian for twenty years, until his defeat by Mr. Carroll. The first case was adjourned when it was claimed that the witnesses had been tampered with.  The second case was adjourned when an important witness failed to appear on summons.

1872

8 Jan, Thomas Bradford of Carnbeg died, leaving assets valued at £9000.  By his will, executed on the 5th December, 1871, disposed of his property amongst his children and other members of his family.

1875

27 Jan, Mary Jane Oliver of Cavananore wrote her will. Obviously, despite the instructions in her uncle's will, Cavananore was not leased out and Mary Jane continued to live there. She died 3 Oct 1875 and her will was proved 10 Nov.

1875

10 Aug, letter from Eliza Jackson to her sister Mary Jane Oliver: I have this day seen the advertisement of your intended auction and from it I concluded that you have given up all idea of labouring the farm; at least for the present. This has been suggested to me to make a proposal; which if you accept, well and good; if you reject; no harm is done. It is that you would permit Andy Jackson to become tenant of the farm, at such a rent as (added to the incomes from Dungooley and Tullyvalee) would pay all the annuities bequeathed by Uncle Bradford in full. Andy to occupy the old house as long as you required the new one. I'd like to see this ad; what was up for auction? From the sound of it, Mary Jane was intending to continue living at Cavananore, but no longer farm the property. So what was she selling? – the house contents seem unlikely, while the farm and livestock were not hers to sell, but belonged to the trustees of her brother's will. And why was Eliza asking Mary Jane's approval of Andy as a prospective tenant? Mary wasn't even supposed to be living there, as under the terms of her brother's will the property should have been leased out to provide for the bequests and annuities. Any decision to let out the property would surely rest with the trustees, not Mary Jane.

1876

Samuel Bradford of Carnbeg leased the land of Cavananore and Anaghvackey "lately in the possession of Miss Mary Jane Oliver now deceased" from Thomas McCullagh of Derryvalley, acting in his capacity as a trustee of the estate of Andrew Coulter Bradford. Andrew Bradford indemnified Thomas McCullagh against any damages, costs and expenses incurred through any action brought by Thomas Jackson as residual devisee of the estate of Andrew Coulter Bradford. SEE: Agreement to Indemnify

1879

In March, lands from the estate of the Earl of Roden were sold in the Land Court. Samuel Bradford purchased two lots: Lot 4 in Ballynahattan for £1560, and Lot 5 in Sportsman's Hall for £6000.

 1879

 26 Mar, in Dundalk Poor-Law Union elections, Samuel Bradford, jun, re-elected for Dundalk North Ward.

1879

16 Dec, Samuel Bradford, of Carnbeg, sued Mr. Edward Carleton, proprietor of the Dundalk Herald, for damages for four publications in that journal, which were alleged to be libellous. The jury found for the plaintiff - £5 damages.

1880

Feb, Samuel Bradford of Carnbeg appointed to the magistracy.

1880

Feb, Samuel Bradford, J.P., Deputy Vice-Chairman of the Dundalk Board of Guardians, allowed the tenants on his estates a reduction of 15 per cent on the half-year's rent due last November.

1880

7 Apr, letter from Eliza Jackson to son Thomas: In the midst of sorrow, something has turned up, to take off one’s attention a general election. The representation is bitterly contested in some places; this county among others. We will know how it will end within this week. ... There was a real Irish shindig in Dundalk last week, boxing, stone throwing, window breaking &c. The two candidates for the borough boxed in the Courthouse. Our dear Cousin Sam took a warm interest in one of the candidates; but the one he favoured did not win and the mob went through the town singing "We’ll hang Sam Bradford on a sour apple tree". Sam’s popularity stands at zero, notwithstanding all his mean compliances with the P. party.

1880

2 Nov, letter from Eliza Jackson to son Thomas: Lionsden is a lovely place; but still it is not the old ground, & still I am not without hope to see that back in the family before I die. Sam Bradford is losing by it; & if you were back, I would not be surprised if he would offer it to you. The loss in death of cattle that he has sustained in it is something awful, a thing that never happened before; & I must tell you a good joke that amused me no little; Sam fell out with his mother; so he put a bed & bedding into a [float?]; & set out for Cavananore accompanied by a confidential man of his. They arrived at 10 o’clock at night; & left it at 4 next morning! I would like to know their experience of the sight but they told no one; & kept the whole matter as quiet as possible. The place is said to be haunted; but I know what the ghost is; just the roaring of the chimneys in the empty house. Everyone who had a hand in that villainous transaction about Cavananore now sees their error & is sorry for it; Johnny McCullagh among the rest.

1881

1 Jun, letter from Eliza Jackson to son Thomas: Our “solvent tenant” is beginning to be a little slack in paying his rent. I jogged Mr Reid’s memory this day about it. Did I write you that Sam endeavoured to sleep a night in Cavananore, and had to fly out of it before evening? He fled actually naked; durst not venture back for his clothes; but had to send a man for them. The poor old Perpetual was doting for long before he died. In his lucid moments, he was sorry enough for the offence he gave us; but he never had sense enough to come & ask pardon. If he had done so I would have forgiven him.

1883

8 Jun, letter from Eliza Jackson to son Thomas: His enemies Sam Bradford and Co did him a good turn; though they did not intend it. Sam is not making a fortune in Cavananore; and I think will get it handy enough, when you come home; at least, at would not be surprised if you would, but I would not hint this to any one. To do so would only make him hold more closely by it. I appear to be quite careless about it. It is best to let the offer come from himself.

1883

7 Nov, letter from Eliza Jackson to son Thomas: Cousin Sam has got a tenant for Cavananore house and gardens at last. Dr Wilson the Dispensary Dr who is married to Miss [Pollock?] is said to be giving him £30 a year for them. How long he will stay there remains to be seen. He has hitherto been living with Charles [Pollock]; so he cannot but know all about the place. I have heard nothing since, about the sale of Sam’s land; but we still are on the alert; if anything should transpire.

1884

4 Jun, letter from Eliza Jackson to son Thomas: I hear also that Mrs. Bradford is not well. Cousin Sam [?] I hear has plenty to do between rent & interest of borrowed money, he has £2000 a year to make up.

1885

2 Dec, letter from Eliza Jackson to son Thomas: Dr. Wilson is going to live in Carrickastuck; so leaving empty walls in Cavananore to Cousin Sam This is a step in the right direction, it will leave Cousin Sam more willing to part with the place; for £40 a year will be missed out of the profits; and he is said to be tired enough of his bargain already. I fully expect that he will offer it to you when you come home, with a great flourish of trumpets & profession of friendship. Alexander Dickie has been making some overtures already; through Eliezer and Peggy; I do not speak to him; so he does not come here. I have dreaded that Sam himself would write to you; and make an offer of selling it. It is not worth a shilling beyond the rent; and he did not give a shilling for it; except what he gave as bribes to the Trustees. But if he would sell his own parts of the land; that might be worth buying; there are 90 acres in which at £20 an acre and he could not get more; would come to £1800.It is said that Sam is coming down in the world; no doubt he feels the hardness of the times as well as all other agriculturists.

1887

10 Aug, letter from Eliza Jackson to son Thomas: Cousin Sam was not able to pay the May rent this time; he has got to the 20th inst. to do it. Probably he will take advantage of this new land act, to break his lease and have the land revalued. We have not seen the last of the rascality of Uncle Bradford’s trustees yet.

1887

21 Oct, letter from Eliza Jackson to son Thomas: Did I tell you that Sam Bradford has put Cavananore into the Land Court, with a view of having the rent reduced? That man has wrought us one annoyance; but he can do nothing more that the Lord permits; and his time will come. Of course the Trustees will make the best defence they can.

1887

Oct, Samuel Bradford, Carnbeg, nominated as a valuer by the Irish Commission for aiding County Court Judges under the provisions of the 32nd section of the Land Law (Ireland) Act, 1887.

1887

29 Nov, letter from Eliza Jackson to son Thomas: Cousin Sam is making an awful havoc in Cavananore, cutting timber though that was reserved in the lease. Eliezer went to see what was done; and he has written to Mr Reid about it. Willy Corr thinks that his lease can be broken because of it. His case has not yet come on. Alexr Dickie says that Sam intends to sell the whole place; his own part of the land, and all; when he gets a reduction of the rent. What a job those old wretches the Trustees made of it letting that man in, to plague us. But they thought of nothing but getting bribes for themselves. There is one comfort in this and all other cases; the worst man in the world can do nothing more than God permits to be done. Sam’s time is coming, and old and failed as I am, I hope to live to see it.

1887

21 Dec, letter from Eliza Jackson to son Thomas: Sam Bradford has applied to the Land Court to have a fair rent fixed on Cavananore. Alexr Dickie says he intends to sell both it and his own part of the land, as soon as he gets that done. The case is listed for trial in Dundalk on the 10th of January. Of course the Trustees will make the best defence they can; they have instructed Willy Corr. Sam has also cut down and sold the timber out of the farm; though his lease reserved it. Revd Mr Reid and Thompson Brown are to meet here next Monday with Eliezer Gilmore in order to go up, and inspect what is done. What confusion those perjured wretches, James Gillmer, Thos McCullagh and Joe Dickie laid up in store for us! Mr Reid & his wife, Alexr Dickie & Johnny McCullagh also did their best against us. They profess to be sorry for it now; my opinion is, that if they had been as wise then, as they are now; they would have acted differently; and if they were no wiser now than they were then; that they would do the same thing over again.

1888

14 Feb, letter from Eliza Jackson to Minnie Jackson: The Land Commission have given their decision about Cavananore. Cousin Sam is to get a reduction of £60 a year on his rent; but he is not satisfied with that; and has appealed to the superior Court; so the case must be tried over again.

1888

2 May, letter from Eliza Jackson to son Thomas: Cousin Sam has paid no rent for two terms. He is said to be greatly embarrassed; and I would not be surprised if he would make an offer to sell Cavananore to you. If he does so, beware of him, for he is a kittle customer, and I would not wish him to be enriched at your expense. He has not left a tree worth cutting on C.nore that he has not cut and sold; like the dishonourable fellow that he is.

1888

4 Jun, letter from Eliza Jackson to son Thomas: But if I was depending on Cousin Sam, I would be badly off. He is due a year’s rent & has no word of paying it that I hear. He has cut & sold all the timber worth selling, though it was expressly reserved in his lease.

1889

2 Jan, letter from Eliza Jackson to son Thomas: Cousin Sam’s affairs are in every body’s mouth; & the rent cannot be got from him. I dread lest he would write to you; or entrap you on your arrival. Have no dealings with him until after you see us. He is a kittle [8] customer, & capable of playing any trick. There have been ten new Commissioners appointed. Thompson Brown was a candidate but was not successful. I must give you an extract from “The Dundalk Herald” which is not bad; we had a laugh at it. After examining the new Commissioners. “The Herald says – “For the ten new appointments, there were over 1200 candidates, about 20 of them hailing from Co. Louth; the (sic) the generous hearted proprietors of Carnbeg it is stated being one of the number. If so he has failed again. But what he has lost in [Mammon?], he has gained in Righteousness; for we are informed that he was elevated last week by the Dundalk Presbyterian Congregation an elder of this Kirk”! (December 22nd 1888)

1889

31 Oct,  the trustees of the lands of Cavananore sued Samuel Bradford, J.P., for loss and damage sustained by reason of the defendant cutting down and converting to his own use twenty-seven trees, which grew along the avenue leading to the mansion or dwelling-house in said lands.  Damages were laid at £50.  There was a second process for a like number of trees cut down by the defendant, and a like amount of damages was claimed. The jury found for the plaintiff, and assessed the compensation at 10s per tree, or £26 in all, with costs.

1890

Feb, Samuel Bradford, tenant of the trustees of Bradford, was granted a judicial rent of £185 in the Land Commission Court. The old rent was £247. The location of the land in question was not given, but presumably this referred to Cavananore.

1890

6 Mar, Samuel Bradford, J.P., Carnbeg, in the Record Court appealed decrees for £13 10s and £4 1s costs and expenses in each case obtained on verdicts given by juries at the October quarter sessions as compensation for timber illegally cut down by appellant (defendant in the court below) and converted to his own use. The judge said said the conduct of the appellant was intolerable, and that if the three actions had been brought before him he would have given £50 in each case.  The decrees of the Court below were confirmed, with costs.

1890

17 Jun, case in the Court of Appeal, Samuel Bradford v. Trustees of Andrew Bradford.. The lands in question were located near Dundalk (presumably Cavananore). The Court of Appeal affirmed the decision of the Land Commission.  (What I don't understand is why Samuel Bradford was the appellant in this case. Was he trying to get the judicial rent set by the Land Commission reduced?)

1891

19 Jan, letter from Eliza Jackson to son Andrew: There has been a new instance of "Loves labours lost" in Cavananore; and the pity is that James Gillmer and the other worthies who so generously gave their neighbour's property to Sam Bradford did not live to see it. The case which I mistakenly wrote to you was to be tried on this day week was tried last Thursday before Judge Monroe and the result was that Sam's judicial lease was broken and the Receiver under the Court ordered to take possession of our part of Cavananore next day. Accordingly, he came there on Friday accompanied by Bailiffs and evicted Mrs. McCoy, Thomas Murray, and an old woman who lives in one of the houses; allowing them to go in again as caretakers and giving each a penny a week. So you see that other people beside Alexander Dickie can play at penny a week; and my poor innocent Sam is done with that part of Cavananore. The people who took the land in conacre were in a state of desperation; they had given Sam securities for payment, and now will not get the lands. Kelly of Ballybinvie gave them great comfort; he said "Devil [mend] them, and that the Jacksons were always civil and decent people; & that nobody should have joined in a plan to rob them." Sam was allowed a certain time to remove his cattle & the judicial lease which he thought a great benefit was just what settled him; for he was not restrained from subletting by the lease he got from Messrs McCullagh and Gillmer. Sam is due a year's rent to the Trustees, & a year's head rent last Novr. These rents must be paid before the farm can be disposed of; but the Bank of Ireland is a very good stake for payment. What the Courts will do with the land now that they have got possession, remains to be seen. There is a great difficulty in this case. A large part of the land is ploughed, and so left useless for grazing; and they cannot let it for conacre; that would be the same thing that Sam was condemned for. They must do something soon; as nothing will be made of it this year. Sam made awful swearing, but was not believed; he swore that the land was in as good condition as when he got it, & that his steward had cut the hedges unknown to him, and plenty more.

1892

17 Nov, letter from Eliza Jackson to son Thomas: I have quite enough for the present one; besides, probably Mr Reid will expect you to pay the half year’s rent of Cavananore; and of that of course I will get my share.

1893

11 Jul, letter from Eliza Jackson to son Thomas: Your steward in Cavananore could not get help for love of money to manage the hay and turnips; so Eliezer and I sent all our men up for two days. That place looks beautiful, and the old house at home is not getting out of repair.

1893

9 Aug, letter from Eliza Jackson to son Thomas: You have a fine harvest in Cavananore and it is now being reaped. Eliezer’s men and mine were up yesterday helping; and are then again today.

1894

28 Mar, letter from Eliza Jackson to son Thomas: Urker, Liscalgot and Cavananore are flourishing apace. You would rub your eyes if you saw the latter place; it is coming around to be like what it used to be. If cousin Sam had had it a couple of years longer, it would have been little worth.

1895

6 Feb, letter from Eliza Jackson to son Thomas: Sam Bradford is managing to keep on foot much as usual. He is to get £650 for the lowering of the office houses in Dowdalhill. A decision has been given in the Law Courts in Dublin that his sister’s pastures must be the first charge on his property. I am heartily glad that they will not be wronged out of what their father left them.

Elie does all the buying and selling for me and only for him, I could not do so well. He is well able to manage his own business and what he does for me & for Cavananore and is thriving upon it; but I never call him to account about Cavananore; to do so would seem as if I distrusted him. Cavananore has a difficult time since it was got out of Sam Bradford’s hands.

1895

4 Mar, Samuel Bradford made claims for the malicious burning of his stables and farm buildings at Dowdallshill. The jury returned a verdict that the fire was not malicious.

1895

17 Oct, letter from Eliza Jackson to son Thomas: I went with Ely to Cavananore yesterday and never since the first day that I remember did I see it in such prosperity; so much corn on it, or so many cattle; the crops [?it] this year were something marvellous, everyone wondered at it; and the cattle throve admirably. Every minute I wished you could see it. The new home is finished and Thomas Murray is living in it; and only that I am tied to Urker, I would covet to live in it myself. It contains two beautiful rooms with boarded floors, & a tiled kitchen, and a nice porch. What made me long for a house like it was that there are no stairs in it.

1896 18 Aug, letter from Eliza Jackson to her son Thomas: We had a great picnic to Cavananore, 15 in number, but probably Minnie has told you all about it. You would be delighted to see Cavananore, it never looked better, even in Uncle Bradford’s or Aunt Mary’s time.

1898

25 Feb, Court order issued to Eliza Jackson to provide " all Deeds and Documents relating to the premises for sale" in " the matter of the Estate of Samuel Bradford - Owner and Petitioner; and in the matter of the Estate of ... Trustees of the Will of Andrew Bradford deceased - Owners of Land; and in the matter of the Partition Feb 1868 and 1876". What was this all about? My guess is that Samuel Bradford was forced to sell all his holdings, not just those included in the 1900 sale (perhaps because of debt?), and that the court order was issued to clarify boundaries in regard to the Cavananore and Annaghvacky holdings of Samuel Bradford and of the estate of Andrew Coulter Bradford.

1900

Oct 31. Land Court – estate of Samuel Bradford, and estate of Thomas Jackson (representative of residuary legatees of will of Andrew Coulter Bradford) – sale of lands in Cavananore, Carnbeg, Dowdall's Hill, Sportsman Hall & Ballynahattan. The portion of Cavananore for sale is in the northern part of the townland, and does not seem to be in any way part of the former holdings of Andrew Coulter Bradford. SEE: http://www.thesilverbowl.com/documents/1900Oct31-BRADFORD-JACKSON.html

1911

The 1911 census shows Sir Thomas JACKSON as owner and Patrick LYNCH as caretaker of Cavananore.There are four residences indicated in the census, including one that is unoccupied. All owned by Sir Thomas JACKSON. The occupants are:

Patrick LYNCH age 75, head of family; Roman Catholic. Living with him are his two daughters: Mary Jane LYNCH (age 32) and Bridget LYNCH (30). Patrick LYNCH was a widower and was the care-taker for Sir Thomas JACKSON. While he could not read, both his daughters could read and write. He and his children were all born in Co. Kildare. The house was described as a 1st class house with 11 windows at the front. NOTE: Current photos show considerably fewer windows, which may give an idea of how much was lost in the fire of 1923.

Patrick LYNCH jr. age 42 Head of Family and an agricultural labourer, Roman Catholic; wife Annie, age 38, married for 14 years; daughter Mary age 13, Son Tom age 11 and daughter Kathleen, age 8. The house was described as a 2nd class house. All can read and write.

John CUNNINGHAM, age 43, Roman Catholic, an agricultural labourer; Wife, Mary age 28 married for 3 years and son Patrick CUNNINGHAM, age 1. The house was described as a 2nd class house.

In terms of out buildings connected to the main house, there were 2 stables, 1 coach house, 6 cow houses, 1 calf house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn, 1 potato house and one shed connected with the main house. The other two inhabited houses each had a piggery and fowl house.

1915 List of lands owned by Sir Thomas JACKSON in Co. Armagh & Louth NOTE: This list of lands had to have been prepared after 1903 (when Sir Thomas Jackson became a Baronet) and before or shortly after his death in 1915. It may have been a list prepared at the time of his will probate. We also know that he owned the Cavananore lands at least by the time of the 1901 census and likely (judging from mentions in family correspondence) as early as 1892.

 

 

 

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