Home Biographies History Places Documents Letters Family Tree Misc. Contact NEW Blog

 

 

Walter Richardson kindly sent this family tree to me and has given me permission to post it on my site. One of these days, I will find out how these GRIFFINs connect with the Frederick GRIFFIN who married Mary JACKSON. Given the frequency of GRIFFIN letters, news clippings and photos in the family albums of JACKSON descendents, I am assuming there was a close connection. All I need to find is one missing link.
UPDATE: July 7, 2016. The missing links have been found. SEE: GRIFFINs of Newry. Thanks to the considerable help that I have received over the years from John GRIFFIN, Victor GRIFFIN & Walter RICHARDSON as well as from Ros DAVIES on her Ros Davies Web site. I could have acheived this without them.

 

Descendants of Philip George Griffin 

Generation No. 1

 

1.  PHILIP GEORGE1 GRIFFIN was born Unknown in Ireland, and died Unknown. Occupation: Farmer

Child of PHILIP GEORGE GRIFFIN is:

2.           i.     JOHN GILMORE2 GRIFFIN, b. Unknown, Castleblaney, County Monaghan, Ireland?; d. Bef. 1912, Ireland

Generation No. 2 

2.  JOHN GILMORE2 GRIFFIN (PHILIP GEORGE1) was born Unknown in Castleblaney, County Monaghan, Ireland?, and died Bef. 1912 in Ireland.  He married ELEANOR SARAH PELAN April 16, 1888 in The Methodist Church, City of Londonderry, Ireland, daughter of JOHN PELAN and ELEANOR HAZELTON.  She was born December 1863 in Lurgan, Shankill Parish, County Armagh, Ireland, and died February 16, 1955 in Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Occupation: Grocer and Salesman for Lever Brothers.

Notes for JOHN GILMORE GRIFFIN:
Family tradition has it that the Griffin family were Welsh who accompanied Cromwell to Ireland.

More About ELEANOR SARAH PELAN:

Baptism: January 13, 1864, Lurgan Church of Ireland, Shankill Parish, County Armagh, Ireland
Burial: February 18, 1955, Mount Pleasant Cemetery, 375 Mount Pleasant Road, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Section 31, Lot 331.
Emigration: 1912, Left Newry, County Down to Canada with her 6 son's.
Nickname: Nellie

Residence: 1914, 49 Garnock Ave., September 15, 1916 in Laurel Apartments, 104 Kippendavie Ave., and by August 1919 it was 120 Wheeler Ave., Ken Beach. In 1945 48 Columbine Ave.. All Toronto, Canada

More About JOHN GRIFFIN and ELEANOR PELAN:
Marriage: April 16, 1888, The Methodist Church, City of Londonderry, Ireland
Witnesses: April 16, 1888, Mary Elizabeth Pelan and Hugh ?

Children of JOHN GRIFFIN and ELEANOR PELAN are:

              i.     FREDERICK SAMUEL GILMORE3 GRIFFIN, b. March 05, 1889, Newry, County Down, Ireland; d. January 15, 1946, At home, 231 Glengrove Ave., W. Toronto, Ontario, Canada; m. LUELLA FLOOD, 1922, Toronto, Canada; b. Unknown; d. Unknown.

Notes for FREDERICK SAMUEL GILMORE GRIFFIN:

Starting as a cub reporter, Frederick ultimately became a feature writer for both The Toronto Daily Star and the Toronto Star Weekly. He was a reporter for 30 years. As their War Correstondent he was overseas for five years covering nearly every phase of Canada's fighting forces, including Dunkirk, Dieppe, Sicily, Italy, D-Day and Northwest Europe. He is a member of Canadian Newsreporters Hall of Fame, inducted in 1977 and was the author of two books, "Soviet Scene" and "Variety Show". Before coming to Canada in 1912 he had been a junior master in a boy's grammer school in Ireland. First job in Canada was in Eaton's basement, of a large department store.

More About FREDERICK SAMUEL GILMORE GRIFFIN:

Burial: January 18, 1946, Mount Pleasant Cemetery, 375 Mount Pleasant Road, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Cause of Death: Heart Attack after shoveling snow from his driveway.
Nickname: Fred
Occupation: Feature writer for The Star, Toronto newspaper.

More About FREDERICK GRIFFIN and LUELLA FLOOD:
Marriage: 1922, Toronto, Canada

              ii.     JOHN PELAN GRIFFIN, b. March 25, 1891, Castleblaney, County Monaghan, Ireland; d. November 27, 1970, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; m. ETHEL ADELLA GOVIER, June 1927, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; b. Unknown, Canada; d. November 16, 1981, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Notes for JOHN PELAN GRIFFIN:
John enlisted in the 1st. Brigade, 1st. Battery as a driver in the field artillery, Canadian Expenitionary Force in Valcartier, Quebec on September 22, 1914. His Regimental number was 40172. He belonged to the active militia and had 3 years prior service as a member of the North of Ireland Imperial Yeomanry (North Irish Horse) and 3 years in The Governor Generals Body Guard, Toronto, Canada. He was 5' 7" tall, His chest girth expanded was 35", complexion was dark, grey eyes and black hair. Member of the Church of England. His left arm had a horse's head and crossed flags tattoo and a tattoo of a flag and rifle on his right arm. Sailed from Quebec to England on the SS Manitoba on October 3 or 4, 1914. Embarked from Avonmouth England for France on February 8, 1915. Appointment in the field to be acting Bombadier on June 24, 1915. Promoted to Corporal February 22, 1916 and to Sergeant August 1, 1916. John's military will of July 13, 1916 gave $100 to his friend Miss Docidle (sp?) Robinson of Ravenhill Park, Belfast, Ireland and the rest of his property to his mother. Wounded by a musturd gas shell, which damaged his eyes and blistered his skin on August 21, 1917 at Loos and transfered to #7 General Hospital in Saint Omer, France. A cable was sent home on August 30 saying that he was wounded and another on September 17 that he was doing well. Transfered to Bevan Military Hospital in Sandgate, Kent, England and the Military Hospital, Shorncliffe on September 4, 1917. To the Canadian Convalescent Hospital in Monks Horton, Kent on October 7, 1917. Discharged from hospital December 13, 1917 and transfered to Wiltey. To Bramshott on March 22, 1918 and back to Wiltey on April 4, 1918. Posted to Rhyl January 23, 1919 and left Rhyl for Canada February 15, 1919 on the HMT Canada. Arrived in Halifax on February 23, 1919. His prior to discharge exam said he had Scarlet Fever as a child, hammer toes and a broken nose (Abt. 1903) before entering the Army. From being gassed he had a partial loss of function of eyes and artificial light hurts them and reading was not advisable. Discharged in Toronto for medical problems (Chronic Conjunctivitis) from being gassed, on March 17, 1919. Awarded the 1914-15 star, British War and Victory Medals.

More About JOHN PELAN GRIFFIN:

Burial: November 30, 1970, St. Johns Cemetery Norway, 256 Kingston Road, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Military service: Bet. September 22, 1914 - March 17, 1919, WW 1, Army
Nickname: Jack, Paddy
Occupation: 1914, Clerk, after WW 1 he was a Frontiersman (Uniformed armed security guard).

Notes for ETHEL ADELLA GOVIER:

In her obit it list grandchildren as Byron, Christine, Patricia (Moore), Mary (Ya?), Elizabeth, David and John. Great grandchildren Amy and Christopher. Except for Byron I have not been able to place them with the correct parents.

More About ETHEL ADELLA GOVIER:

Burial: November 18, 1981, St. Johns Cemetery Norway, 256 Kingston Road, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Nickname: Queenie

More About JOHN GRIFFIN and ETHEL GOVIER:
Marriage: June 1927, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

             iii.     PHILIP GEORGE GRIFFIN, b. March 18, 1893, Newry, County Down, Ireland; d. November 17, 1945, Christie Street Military Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; m. (1) OLIVE MARY LOMAS, March 20, 1915, Newport, Wales; b.1892 In Sitapur, India (SOURCE LDS Church); d. Unknown; m. (2) FLORENCE MARIE ATKINSON, July 04, 1936, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; b. October 26, 1909, Claresholm, Alberta, Canada; d. August 14, 1981, Pefferlaw, Ontario, Canada.

Notes for PHILIP GEORGE GRIFFIN:
Phillip enlisted as a trooper in the Royal Canadian Dragoons Militia 1913-1914. He Joined the Canadian Expenitionary Force, in Valcartier, Quebec on September 22, 1914. He was 5' 11" tall, his chest girth expanded was 36", complexion was fair with blue eyes and dark brown hair. Member of the Church of England. On his right fore-arm was a tattoo of an eagle and flag, British flag and gun. On his left fore-arm was a tattoo of a heart and cross, R.I.F.. Arrived England October 15, 1914. Promoted to Corporal January 28, 1915. Promoted to machine gun Sergeant with the Royal Canadian Dragoons on February 23, 1915. Arrived Boulogne, France May 4, 1915 and in the field from October 20, 1915. Promoted to Sergeant Major November 25, 1916. Sprained his shoulder playing football and in a field hospital December 27, 1916 to January 2, 1917. He received a field commission to Lieutenant on April 15, 1917 in the Canadian Cavalry machine gun corps. Wounded in his nose October 9, 1918. Returned to duty October 14, 1918. Left France for England on April 16, 1919 and sailed for Canada from Liverpool May 21, 1919 and arrived in Halifax May 28, 1919. Discharged in Toronto December 3, 1919. After the war he served with the Lord Strathcona's until leaving military service. He entered World War 2 January 1, 1940 as a Captain and was a staff officer at Ottawa. He was given command of a squadron of the Lord Strathcona's with the rank of Major. He succeeded to the command of the unit in England and took it to Sicily and Italy as a LCol. Colonel Griffin was the Commanding Officer of the 2nd Armoured Regiment, Lord Strathcona's Horse, Royal Canadian Armoured Corps between October 1942 and July 1944. He died on Saturday November 17, 1945. He had a full military funeral on Tuesday November 20, 1945. He is Commemorated on Page 520 of the Second World War Book of Remembrance. As a unit of the 5th Armoured Brigade, 5th Armoured Division, they landed at Naples, Italy on December 1, 1943. Phillip was awarded the Distinguished Service Order for his part in the Battle of the Melfa River (Liri Valley) on May 24, 1944. LCol. Griffin's battle cry "Push On" was familiar to every man in the regiment by the end of the day. Philip was wounded in Italy and his health was poor due to recurrent internal hemorrhages, but he insisted on remaining with his unit. Subsequently this caused his death. An article in the Star July 27, 1944, said that Philip "is reported to be the only Canadian officer commanding a unit in action who wears the 1914-15 ribbon which marks him as one of the last war's originals. He is one of the very few Canadian officers of LCol. rank or higher who is a veteran of the last war." In the fall of 1944 he was promoted to the rank of full Colonel and returned to Canada and was acting Corps commander at Camp Borden at the time of his death. Awarded the 1914-15 Star, British War and Victory Medal's for WW1 service.

More About PHILIP GEORGE GRIFFIN:
Burial: November 20, 1945, Prospect Cemetery Veteran's Plot, 1450 St. Clair Ave. West, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Plot Sec. 7, Grave 522.
Military service: WW1 and WW2, Army Colonel
Nickname: Pat
Occupation: 1914, Clerk, between the war's Advertising Manager for Imperial Tobacco Company (Players Cigarettes).

More About OLIVE MARY LOMAS:
Residence: 1917, 67 Marlboro Road, Newport, Wales. According to the 1901 UK census index she was in Newport, Wales in 1901 and she was born in India. Her parents were David and Charlotte. It may be that her father was a civil servant in India. His name does not come up in pubications on The Imperial Bank of Persia or HSBC.

More About PHILIP GRIFFIN and OLIVE LOMAS:
Marriage: March 20, 1915, Newport, Wales

Notes for FLORENCE MARIE ATKINSON:
Some time after Philip's death, Florence and their son Peter moved to one of the West Indian Islands. It's unknown at what date they came back to Canada.

More About FLORENCE MARIE ATKINSON:
Residence: 1945, 465 Avenue Road, Toronto, Canada

More About PHILIP GRIFFIN and FLORENCE ATKINSON:
Marriage: July 04, 1936, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

             iv.     SYDNEY HERBERT GRIFFIN, b. April 11, 1895, Newry, County Down, Ireland; d. April 15, 1941, St. Anne de Bellevue Military Hospital, Quebec, Canada; m. ETHEL GREENE, April 1919, Dungannon, County Tyrone, Ireland; b. February 19, 1892, Ireland; d. February 18, 1963, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Notes for SYDNEY HERBERT GRIFFIN:
Sydney enlisted as a private #10211 in the machine gun detachment of the 3rd Battalion 1st Brigade, Canadian Expeditionary Force on September 22, 1914 in Valcartier, Quebec. He was 5' 9.5" tall, chest girth expanded was 35", complexion and hair were fair and he had grey eyes. Went overseas October 3, 1914. He received his Corporal stripes on Salisbury Plain, England. Arrived in Nazaire, France February 11, 1915. His mother received a cable from now corporal Sydney in May 1915 saying that he was safe. He was made a Sergeant at Rouen, May 23, 1915. Battle of Festubert 15-27 May, 1915. In January 1916 attended training school in France and was made a Lieutenant in the 3rd Battalion on January 16, 1916 and was attached to the machine gun company of the 1st Brigade in February. Just before Zillebeke, Flanders he received a transfer as a machine gun officer in the 4th Central Ontario Battalion, Infantry. He was wounded by shrapnel, which caused multiple wounds and burns to his hand on July 10, 1916 at Zillebeke. Returned to duty July 13, 1916. Promoted to Captain on December 9, 1916 after the Battle of Ypres. Had a attack of appendicitis on December 6, 1916 while in the trenches at Vimy Ridge. Admitted to 20th General Hospital at Etaples on December 17, 1916 and transfered to County of London War Hospital, Epson on December 22, 1916 and was operated on December 28. Major in 1917.Wounded a second time, in his right hand, August 18, 1917 (3rd Battle of Ypres?). Treated in the 7th General Hospital in Saint Omer. He was awarded the Military Cross and was Mentioned in Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig's Despatches of April 7, 1918 for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When the attack was pinned down by enemy machine gun fire, he organized a platoon from headquarters personnel armed with 3 Lewis machine guns. By quick rushes he and 2 men got up one of the Lewis guns, which he mounted and fired himself, silencing the enemy fire and enabling the Battalion to move forward to its objective. The commanding officer, having become a casualty he carried out the work of consolidation. His coolness and energy inspired all ranks. Transfered to Aldershott, England for senior officer course on January 6, 1919. August 3, 1919, left Liverpool, England on the SS Metagama and arrived in Quebec August 14, 1919. Sydney returned home with his bride after an absence of almost 5 years. He was discharged August 15, 1919 and was 5' 11" and 130 lbs.. Sydney was an Army Major in the Veterans Guard of Canada in WW2 and died on active service on April 15, 1941 while commanding an internment camp in Quebec. He is Commemorated on Page 31 of the Second World War Book of Remembrance. He was also awarded the 1914-15 Star and the British War and Victory Medal's.

More About SYDNEY HERBERT GRIFFIN:
Burial: April 17, 1941, With a full military funeral at Montreal (Mount Royal) Cemetery, 1297 Ch de la Foret, Outremont, Quebec, Canada Sec. G.943, Grave 312 (Military Lot).
Military service: WW1 and WW2, Army Major
Nickname: Paddy
Occupation: 1914, Clerk in the T. Eaton Company
Residence: 1941, 4443 Old Orchard Ave., Montreal, Quebec, Canada

More About ETHEL GREENE:

Burial: Montreal (Mount Royal) Cemetery, 1297 Ch de la Foret, Outremont, Quebec, Canada Section Mount Murray 70-F.
Residence: 1963, 4443 Old Orchard Ave., Montreal, Quebec, Canada

More About SYDNEY GRIFFIN and ETHEL GREENE:
Marriage: April 1919, Dungannon, County Tyrone, Ireland

             v.     VICTOR ERNEST GRIFFIN, b. March 16, 1897, Newry, County Down, Ireland; d. September 15, 1916, Killed at the Somme in World War 1.

Notes for VICTOR ERNEST GRIFFIN:
Victor enlisted November 16, 1915 at the recruiting depot in Toronto, Canada. He was 5' 11.25" tall, Chest expanded was 34.5", Weight-134 lbs., Complexion and Hair was fair and he had dark blue Eyes. Member of the Church of England. Had a mole on right hip, thigh, buttock and left upper lip. He had a scald on his right forearm. Became a member of the 81st. Battalion on November 26, 1915. Unit sailed from Halifax on the S.S. Olympic on April 28, 1916. Transferred to the 18th. Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force in France on June 29, 1916. Proceeded to join unit in the field on July 12, 1916. Joined the Canadian Infantry, Western Ontario Regiment, 18th. Battalion, 2nd Division on July 21, 1916. He served for awhile near Ypres moving to the Somme River region at the beginning of September 1916. The Canadians launched the offensive to take the village of Courcellette and Regina Trench, on September 15th, 1916 at dawn with the help of tanks behind a creeping barrage. The 2nd Division deployed between the villages of Courcellette and Flers as part of an effort to take not to distant Pozieres Ridge. Units engaged in hand-to-hand bayonet fighting. He was reported missing on September 23, 1916. Victor was Killed In Action in the field on Friday, September 15, 1916 and was buried in the communication trench on September 20, 1916 (Sheet Albert, France). The advance against Courcellette and Regina Trench cost 24,000 casualties for the four Canadian Divisions. He received the British War and Victory Medals. Commemorated on Page 95 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.

More About VICTOR ERNEST GRIFFIN:
Burial: September 20, 1916, Vimy Memorial Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France
Military service: Bet. November 16, 1915 - September 15, 1916, Private, Service Number 159615, Army, Canadian Infantry, Western Ontario Regiment, 18th Bn..
Occupation: 1915, Bank Clerk in the Market Branch of the Standard Bank.
Residence: 1915, 49 Garnock Ave., Toronto, Ontario, Canada

             vi.     GERALD WALTER GRIFFIN, b. Abt. 1900, Newry, County Down, Ireland; d. Unknown, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; m. JEAN MARGARET DAVIDSON, Abt. 1929, Canada; b. 1902; d. May 19, 1992, Canada.

Notes for GERALD WALTER GRIFFIN:
Gerald lived for some time in St John, N.B..

More About JEAN MARGARET DAVIDSON:
Nickname: Peggy

More About GERALD GRIFFIN and JEAN DAVIDSON:
Marriage: Abt. 1929, Canada

 

Site Map | Legal Disclaimer | Copyright

© 2006-2014 Sharon Oddie Brown